Look at the Results

Look at the Results

Once you have Couchbase Server running, you can log into the Couchbase Web Console, and start to examine the different features that it provides. These include a facility for inspecting Couchbase documents, organized within buckets.

Access the Console and Log in

The default location for the Couchbase Web Console (whether it is running, as here, in a Docker virtual environment, or directly on your platform) is localhost:8091. So, type this into the address-bar of your browser, and hit return. The following log-in screen is displayed:

The credentials you now enter are ones that have been established by default, by Docker. Your username is Administrator, and your password is password. Type these into the appropriate fields, and again hit return.

Examine the Cluster Overview

You now see the following screen:

This is the Cluster Overview screen, which provides a graphical summary of the current state of your Couchbase cluster. The term cluster might seem unexpected at this point, since you are only running a single instance of Couchbase Server: but that nevertheless does count as a cluster of one. This is confirmed by the Servers panel, at the lower-left, which shows a single active server.

All the values displayed on this screen were configured by default, when you installed Couchbase Server by means of Docker. In production, you will specify these values individually, according to your needs

Notice the Buckets panel, mid-way down. This shows that you have a single active bucket on the system — bucket meaning a logical group of data-items. Taking a closer look at this bucket will give you some idea of how Couchbase stores data, and so prepare your way for making data-queries. So, left-click on the Data Buckets tab, on the horizontal control-bar, near the top of the console:

This now brings up the Data Buckets screen.

Examine your Data Bucket and its Documents

The Data Buckets screen provides information on the single bucket you currently have on the system:

The name of the single bucket, travel-sample appears towards the left of the single row. Additional information is provided in columns, across the row; indicating the number of nodes, the item-count, and information related to memory-allocation and data-related activity.

To inspect the individual documents contained within this bucket, left-click on the Documents button, which is towards the right of the travel-sample row.

The display now changes to the following:

This shows, in a succession of page-views, the Couchbase documents that are contained within the bucket. Since, in the next stages of the Getting Started sequence, you'll perform queries, to pull out specific items and elements, it's worthwhile now to take a look at the structure of a document. So, left-click on the Edit Document button, towards the right of the first row:

The screen now changes, to show the individual document for the row on which you clicked:

Look at the structure of the JSON document now displayed: it consists of a series of name-value (or, as they are sometimes expressed, key-value) pairs. By referencing a name, you can find its value in one or more documents, by means of a query. For example, here, if you searched on the name country, you would return the value United States; if on the name icao, the value MLA.

Next

Now that you have a basic familiarity with the way in which Couchbase Server organizes data, you can start to define and execute queries, in order to return specific data-subsets. You'll experiment with this in the next section, Run Your First N1QL Query.

Other Destinations

To learn more about the Couchbase data-model, take a look at the introduction to Data Modeling Basics. This provides an extensive conceptual account of Couchbase buckets. Additional, practical information can be found in the section Data Bucket Setup.